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IMAGE: SHIRONOSOV
If you’re planning to look for a new job this year, you’re not alone.

Which might leave you wondering: How, exactly, does one get noticed in a crowded, motivated pool of applicants? Sure, you can read the job description, but how can you know what hiring managers are really looking for?  Which applicants stand out from a stack of resumes?  Which sail through the interview process? And — most importantly — how can you be one of those successful candidates?

We figured the best way to find out would be go to the source itself, so we sat down with HR pros and hiring managers at 11 top tech companies that partner with The Muse, like HBO, Comcast, Homeaway and Eventbrite and got some intel on what they’re looking for in 2016.

Some of what we learned was obvious: Tech jobs are booming (you may have heard?), and today’s companies are looking for people who aren’t only masters of their craft, but passionate about their work and their employer.

But we also found something surprising: Many of the qualities hiring managers are after seem to contradict each other. For instance, employers want people who think like entrepreneurs and have a take-charge mindset — but who also learn from others and play nice on the team. They want employees who are confident in their skills and accomplishments — but who also remain humble in what they don’t know.

In these cases, showing off both sets of skills may seem challenging (or leave you wondering how one person could possibly check all the boxes). But fear not. We’ve broken down what we learned and translated what you need to do to strike the perfect balancing act into 8 rules for getting hired in 2016.

Here they are — complete with tips straight from the mouths of hiring managers.

1. Prove you can hit the ground running, then learn along the way

Regardless of the position, we look for candidates who posses a results-driven way of looking at things. We identified the traits that the most successful people at our company possess, something we call the Success Formula, and we are able to structure interview questions that will really gauge if a candidate will succeed here. No matter what skills we are hiring them for, they need to be able to show metrics around how they define success. Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson

No matter what your skill set, companies want to feel confident that you’re an expert at it (at least to the level necessary for the role you’re applying to). In most cases, employers aren’t hiring you to train you — they’re hiring you to jump in and do the job.

So, leave hiring managers with no question that you’re ready to do just that. For every job you’re applying to, read the responsibilities and skills listed on the job description carefully, and then tailor your resume and prepare stories for your interview that show you fit the bill. Too many people expect prospective employers to read between the lines of their experience — and get their resumes tossed in the “no” pile. Instead, be deliberate about showing the hiring manager that you’ve successfully done this job before, and are ready to do it again.

That said, organizations want to feel comfortable that you’d be able to adapt to their preferences, new tools on the market or just better ways of doing things.

They want to know you’re sure of your ways, but not set in them. “We look for life-long learners, who are always in pursuit of growth in their career and personal development,” shares Julia Hartz, president and co-founder of Eventbrite. “In many ways, a skilled engineer is always learning. They are eager to adapt and adopt new skills and languages,” adds Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru.An easy way to show this? Share an anecdote of a time you changed your ways because of something new you learned or adapted what you know to the situation at hand. You can also illustrate that you’re open to different ways of doing things by inquiring about the methods of the company you’re interviewing with. For example, after sharing how you approached growing an email subscriber base, ask the hiring manager what her approach has been up until this point. Not only will it show how interested you are in the company (more on that below), it’ll hint at an interest in learning from the people around you.

2. Be ready to show off cross disciplinary skill sets

At a quickly growing startup like The Muse, our diverse teams work incredibly closely with each other. So we look for people who can easily collaborate with people outside of their skill set: developers who understand the broader business side of things, for example, or non-technical people who can communicate with product and engineering in an effective way. Kathryn Minshew, CEO and co-founder of The Muse

This probably won’t come as a shock, but tech skills are in high demand. A full 100% of the hiring managers we talked to cited engineers as the number one hires they’re looking to make this year — and this demand isn’t slowing down anytime soon. The Bureau of Labor statistics anticipate a 22% growth in software engineering roles from 2012 to 2022 — twice the average growth of other roles. “First, Android and iOS developers roles are huge for us, and hard to hire for. Second, we need Software Development Engineers in Test (SDETs), folks who are traditionally software developers, but develop test frameworks. We’re also looking for full stack developers who focus on frontend and middleware. Finally, we need site reliability engineers — people who can help us get a system up and running,” shares Jessica Sant, senior director of software development and engineering at Comcast, of the hires they’re in need of.

So if you’re a developer, ride the wave, baby. Know how to nail the technical interview so you can show off exactly what you’re able to do, and make an effort to highlight some desirable soft skills — like decisiveness, adaptability, and communications skills — as well the ones that make you stand out from the competition. “I want a well-rounded engineer with hard technical skills, but also really great communication skills. Someone who can get their point across and break it down for a variety of audiences, someone who can collaborate with a cross-functional team and innovate,” shares Sant.

sales-meeting

IMAGE: ARIEL SKELLEY/BLEND IMAGES/CORBIS

That said, companies obviously need more than engineers: Employers cited sales, product management, operations, digital and growth marketing, and business and strategy as other in-demand roles.

Regardless of your specialty, however, the quality of the hour is cross-disciplinary. Employers want to know that you can not only collaborate with a team of people from different departments, but that you can think like them to make working together easier and help your work fit in with larger company goals.

This comes down to learning about functions outside of your own. If you’re technical, look for ways to get involved with and learn more about the business at large. And if engineering’s not in your background — or future? You can still make an effort to know a little bit about the field. Take a free online course or look for opportunities to integrate learning tech into your current job.

Then, don’t miss the opportunity to share that knowledge with hiring managers; even a few quick resume lines about your experience or interest in a field different from your primary one can be enough to whet the hiring manager’s appetite.

3. Be obsessed with the company and the field

The most important quality we look for is a passion for our business: they know what we do and they are excited about the opportunity to come work with us. Stephani Martin, VP of people & culture at Boost Media

You probably want a job that’s about more than just the paycheck. Similarly, employers want to hire people who are there because they love what the company is doing — not just because they need any old job. We heard time and time again from employers just how critical it is to show off why you’re dying to work for them, specifically.

How can you do this without coming off as a superfan or stalker? You don’t need to show up wearing company swag, tweet at the CEO every day or spend the interview gushing about the product. Instead, show off how much you love the company by using your knowledge of it to give a sense of how you’d step into the role. For example, you might mention a time you used the product and a challenge you had with it — and describe how you think you could alleviate that in your role.

“Doing this shows the hiring manager you’re interested in not only the brand, but also working for the brand. You understand the problems, needs and voice, and you have the skills needed to turn that knowledge into results,” says The Muse‘s Robyn Melhuish.

But you should also have interest — and ideally expertise! — in the industry you’re applying to at large. For example, you may love the idea of working for HBO based on your obsession with Game of Thrones, but can you bring enough insider knowledge to help them succeed?

“We recommend that all candidates do their research around industry trends before coming in to interview for any position,” says a talent acquisition specialist at HBO. “It’s great to be familiar with HBO shows, but having a depth of knowledge around the industry as a whole is key. Being able to articulate the bigger picture or sharing thoughts on how a company can stay ahead and innovate helps candidates stand out.”The ideal hire for a company is someone who’s an expert both in her craft and in the field she’s applying it to, so if you’re not already keeping up with industry reading, researching what competitors are doing, engaging with experts on social media and regularly talking shop with like-minded folks, start now! It will give you great talking points to help you prove you’re in the know during the interview, and also show hiring managers your dedication to the industry when they inevitably Google you.

4. Show you’re self-driven but can also play nice on a team

The ideal candidate sees the value in collaboration and can stand behind the belief that everyone has experience that you can learn from. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

Today, everyone needs to be an entrepreneur — or at least have the mindset of one — and companies want to hire people who are going to take ownership of projects without having to be babysat every step of the way. And this isn’t just a philosophy of startups that need people like this to survive — larger organizations are embracing the entrepreneurial ideas of moving faster and innovating more, too. “It is all about ownership versus administration,” shares Sledge of Sailthru. “Candidates who lead the charge, having innovated, designed and architected systems, deployed setups, etc. are exactly what we are looking for.”

To show this off to hiring managers, you’ll want to make sure to highlight three things: the fact that you’re a self starter, your capacity for creative thinking and your ability to work in a fast-paced environment with a lot on your plate. Career specialist Aja Frost has tips for highlighting each of these qualities in your resume; you can also pull out anecdotes that exemplify these traits in your cover letter and interview answers. Was there a time you noticed a problem, came up with a creative solution and then took the initiative to implement it in addition to your other work? Make sure you share that story.

 

teamwork

IMAGE: YURI_ARCURS

But just because you can do things on your own doesn’t mean you always should, and seeing as many companies we talked to attributed their most creative ideas to collaboration, they want to be absolutely sure that you’ll be great at working on teams to make amazing things happen.

In fact, some companies value this so much that they’ll specifically test for it in the interview. ThoughtWorks, a software design company based in San Francisco, for example, gives candidates a pair programming challenge with a current employee. This exercise “serves the purpose of allowing us to understand whether a candidate works collaboratively and how they react to feedback,” shares Laura Nash, recruitment marketing manager. “A candidate that is excited about feedback and is able to adapt as they go demonstrates the open-mindedness and passion we desire.”

So, make sure to show off your team-playership, too. when talking about a big success you had, make sure to mention the other people you collaborated with; when talking about a time you failed, explain the experience of getting feedback from you boss and how you took that moving forward. Oh, and be nice to everyone you meet, from the people in the elevator with you to the receptionist. This is a basic — but telling — sign to employers of how you’ll treat your colleagues day to day.

5. Show passion for your work and your personal life

We also place a lot of emphasis on what a candidate does outside of work, what their hobbies and pastimes are, and their volunteer activities. David O’Connor, senior recruiting manager at Dolby

Companies these days want passionate, inspired employees — not ones who are just clocking in and out. And few things are better determiners of that than truly loving the work that you do.

If that’s not how you feel about jobs you’re applying to, it might be worth considering a career pivot. But if you do, then let it show! Let yourself get genuinely excited when talking about the job.

Let yourself geek out when talking through a particularly tough problem in the technical interview or when presetting ideas for community strategy. Real enthusiasm is obvious — and energizing to hiring managers — so don’t feel like you need to stifle it in the name of being “professional.”Also, show off ways you engage with your career of choice even outside what’s expected of you in your 9-to-5. “Things like writing books, speaking at conferences, or maintaining a blog show us that a candidate is really invested in tech, and it’s more than just a job,” shares Laura Nash, recruitment marketing manager at ThoughtWorks. One easy-but-effective approach: Create an eye-catching personal website that shares some of your related side projects, speaking gigs or volunteer work in addition to your on-the-job accomplishments. “Think ‘show’ instead of ‘tell’ whenever possible: share YouTube videos of a talk you led or a link to a working application you created,” adds Nash.

Of course, in a world where culture and tight-knit relationships are increasingly important to companies, it’s important for the people interviewing you to like you as a person, to want to bring you into their tribe. So they want to learn a little bit about you outside of your work, too! So learn how to be professional — without being boring or totally stifling your personality — in an interview!

“Don’t focus too much on conventional interviewing wisdom which may advise candidates to save personal anecdotes for the end — or to avoid sharing personal stories at all,” says Kimberly Eyhorn, director of global talent acquisition at HomeAway. “Just remember to always bridge the conversation back to your outstanding skills and experience. In a situation where several qualified candidates bring similar levels of value to the table, a hiring manager may be more likely to choose the applicant with whom they had a particularly memorable conversation.”

6. Be specific about your successes and failures

Candidates need to know how to show that they can not only produce results, but how they measure and define success. I’d recommend candidates take a look at past accomplishments and be able to concisely describe how and why they were successful, and back it up with metrics and data points. Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson

Obviously companies want to understand how you’re going to help them succeed, so it’s Job Search 101 to describe your most impressive achievements in your resume and interviews — and make sure to get specific!

Companies don’t just want to hear that you succeeded; they want a sense of the real results you achieved and the steps you took to get there. So don’t just say “I launched a major product” or whatever the success may be — tell the full story. Explain how, the first time you were in charge of a major product launch yourself, you knew you would feel successful if you didn’t just get it out on time, but early, so you dove in immediately, made sure to delegate work smartly and managed to launch a week ahead of schedule. Bonus points if you can quantify these accomplishments to prove you did what you said you did, and did it well.

 

successes-and-failures

IMAGE: BLOOMBERG/CONTRIBUTOR

On the other hand, if you’ve only succeeded and never failed, companies are going to worry about whether you’ll be willing to push yourself (and the company) to try new things. Laura Nash at ThoughtWorks shares, “While we’re always happy to hear of a candidate’s success, the more telling tales that are often skipped are examples of failure… Understanding how someone has learned from a failed attempt at something big and exciting is more interesting to us than a project delivered on-time and on-budget.”

So when faced with a question about your failures, don’t shy away from it. Instead, as we’ve proposed before, pick a real failure, quickly explain what happened, and then spend most of your time talking about how you examined the failure afterward to learn from your mistakes, how you incorporated those lessons moving forward, and how those failures were ultimately able to lead you to other successes down the road.

7. Be just confident enough

The perfect candidate is confident, not only in what they already know but in their capacity to learn something new. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

To make a hiring manager feel confident in you as a candidate, you need to feel confident in yourself and show it! This isn’t just about working through your pre-interview jitters (we hear some power posing can help with that) — it’s about being assured of your skills and your experience and prepared to speak candidly about your areas of growth.

If you tend to hate talking about yourself, we get it — very few of us spend an hour just talking about our accomplishments. If this is you, take career expert Suzanne Gelb’s advice and just think about confidently reporting the facts.

“When you feel confident and good about yourself, you don’t need to magnify your accomplishments or diminish other people’s great work. With a healthy sense of self-pride, you can simply report the facts. No flourishes. No stretching the truth. Just stating who you are and what you’ve done, plain and simple,” she says.Not only will this hopefully help you overcome some fears, it will help you avoid the other end of the spectrum: sounding like you’re cocky or bragging. Companies don’t want someone who thinks they know everything — they want people who are humble about their limitations and excited to learn and grow past them. So don’t be confident to the point of being a know-it-all!

If the interviewer starts talking about something you don’t know, don’t try and fake that you have a background with it — admit that you’ve never heard of that before and ask him or her to explain. When asked about about your biggest weakness, don’t just say something like “perfectionism” and try to move on — share a real challenge you’ve struggled with and ways you’re looking to improve it. If you’re in a technical interview and the hiring manager questions your way of doing things, don’t just push her off — confidently explain your thinking, but also ask how she would have approached the problem.

“Certain skills can be taught, but you have to exhibit the willingness to stretch yourself and to discover your full potential,” adds Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson.

8. Focus on your future and don’t worry too much about your past

The perfect candidate is looking forward to what they hope to accomplish next, while maintaining a personal standard of excellence in what they are working on at present. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

Yes, companies are hiring you to help them do things and go places, but they also want to understand how this job is going to help you go places and achieve your goals. After all, an engaged employee — one who’s developing professionally consistently on the job — is more likely to stay around for years to come.

And while, you shouldn’t spend your entire application explaining why this job would be so great for your career (the focus there should be on how you can help the company), have a sense of your goals and how this job will fit into them. You can mention this in your cover letter, but it’s going to be more powerful during the interview, when you can weave it into questions such as “Tell me about yourself,” “Where do you see yourself in five years?” and “Why are you leaving your current job?” When it’s your turn to ask questions, ask something like “How does the organization support your professional development and career growth?” to show that it’s something you’re really interested in.

And if you have a winding career path that doesn’t exactly make sense with the future you envision for yourself, there’s good news for you — hiring managers are increasingly open to hiring great people, even if they don’t have exactly the background they expected.

looking-away

IMAGE: HERO IMAGES INC./HERO IMAGES INC./CORBIS

“I like candidates who haven’t had one straight path in their career,” says Stephani Martin, VP of people & culture at Boost Media.

“A dynamic work history shows that they are willing to try new things and seek opportunities outside of their comfort zone.”

Learn how to spin your career change in your favor during your job search, focusing on showing the hiring manager all the things we’ve talked about so far — your transferrable skills, your adaptability, your past successes in a variety of fields, the cross-disciplinary thinking you bring to the table — and then lean into your varied past, knowing that you’re showing off the best of what you have to offer the company.

“The perfect candidate will have a combination of strong technical skills, a sense of pride and ownership in his or her work and a desire to work on a team of highly skilled, passionate people in an effort to make an impact on the business,” sums up Tom Aurelio, SVP of people & culture at Priceline.com — oh, and all the the other things mentioned above. We know it might feel like a lot, but it’s a competitive market, and the more of these qualities you’re able to show off, the more likely it is that you’ll be able to land your dream job.

Great post by ERIN GREENAWALD FOR THE MUSE via http://mashable.com

How can Techmeetups.com help you ?

Delivering Startup Happines www.techmeetups.com

We help Startups through Events like Meetups, Workshops, Hackathons, Job Fairs, Events Promo and also have www.techstartupjobs.com to help you recruit your tech team. 

Explore Techmeetups events in Berlin, Paris, London, Barcelona, Amsterdam, New York, Vienna, Lisbon, Madrid

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Applying for a job in a startup and applying for a job in a corporate, are qualitatively different things. Demands of both are different and the mindset you’d require to perform well at both of them is different.

If you have already decided to work for a startup despite all the hurdles that may await you on your way, here are a few tips about things to avoid saying and doing during your startup job interview process.

Using generic phrases

Phrases like fast learner, strategist, initiator of new initiatives will not work for a startup, at least not for a good one – A good startup will expect people who can communicate clearly what they have done and what past result and achievement makes them eligible in less than 140 characters. If you are still left with space to explain your personality, be my guest.

Jump straight to why can you deliver on that particular job they are advertising? Because you’ve done it before? Because you got the network? Because got the figures? Show them the figures.

happy-workers

“Managing” a team

No startup ever has use of managers people who hope to get things done delegating to others. In a startup everyone ships and there is no hierarchy but a flat hierarchy. Everyone is in the field and everyone delivers something at the end of the day – whether code, content, or customer support calls.

Saying how cool and necessary their startup is for the society

Even if that’s true no good startup will ever hire you for flattering.
The better way is to decide what specifically they are call about and address that particular need. For example – I saw your downloads getting to 10,000 in just 10 days, I can help it jump to a 1,000,000 in 30 days. Or your interface is so cool, I’d love to work on some extra things that will boost your conversion in another 3%.

See? Flatter + actionable in the same pitch

Being a “people” person

I don’t know why people use this so much, what exactly do they try to convey and what will it take to remove it from their dictionary. You say you are a people person who knows how to make it win-win for everyone? Well perfect, in other words you are a great salesman. In that case sell my product to someone in a way he is so happy and delighted with the value he gets for his money that he refers 10 more people to buy. That’s a real people person if you ask me.

Being remorseful about 9-5 jobs

This won’t get you selected, not only because it is cliché nowadays, but because no one works 9-5 anyways. Our smartphones and 3G have permanently taken that privilege from us. Therefore both, the average and the great performers work beyond 9-5 but the difference is what they deliver.

If you can’t showcase what you have achieved even within those hours, your rebellious mind will not sell you to the opportunity. It is not about the 9-5 job and it is not because you are forced to do the same thing every single day. It is rather because you are lazy and unwilling to challenge yourself. Contrary to what the folklore says, no company ever forces people to do the same thing or forbids them to innovate within their own context.

You are looking for more challenging role

No you don’t. Get to the point. Be honest, you will be appreciated for that and save many people’s valuable time. What you need is more money.

If you were looking more challenges you would have found some already. The world is not short of challenges. The very fact that you haven’t shipped or built anything in the past few years is a living proof that challenges is not what you are after. Cut the nonsense.

You have already failed in your own startup

Thank the startup folklore again for making it sound cool for people to brag that they have failed a startup, hence being more powerful and experienced as a result of it. That blog you were running? That doesn’t count as a startup unless you found way to monetize it.

What matters more to those who’d hire you is not the mere fact that you failed in your own startup but that you understand the nature of that failure and why exactly it failed. Demonstrating clarity around this will earn you extra points on your startup job’s application.

Great post by ANJLI JAIN via  www.iamwire.com

How can Techmeetups.com help you ?

Delivering Startup Happines www.techmeetups.com

We help Startups through Events like Meetups, Workshops, Hackathons, Job Fairs, Events Promo and also have www.techstartupjobs.com to help you recruit your tech team.

people-apple-iphone-writing

 

Technology is changing the business world. Human resources is typically a department that is constantly jam-packed with activities. Advancements in technology have done a lot to reduce administrative tasks so HR reps are able to focus on bigger hands-on issues.

A number of HR processes have been made simple by technology with improved accuracy. Here are some of the ways in which technology has changed the landscape of human resources.

Hiring

Before the digital age, the classified ads were the main place to browse job listing and the process involved a heap of paper applications. Then, human resources reps had to screen and test potential candidates to determine who to bring in for an interview. When the process was this complex, multiple interviews were almost always necessary. The biggest problem was that a lot of good candidates would get lost in the long process and look for work elsewhere.

Now, recruiting has been made a lot easier. The process of filling out applications have been made simple and screening is mostly done with automation. This makes the process much quicker and more efficient. Even though there is no way to eliminate humans from hiring methods, leaving the initial steps to technology is a great way to keep everything moving quickly.

Electronic application programs have the ability to conduct background checks and track the online activities of candidates. By the time HR reps have made the decision to interview, the candidate has already gone through the screening process so valuable time is not wasted.

Employee Benefits

employee-benefits

As most companies will tell you, employee packages are not one size fits all. Now, there are many options available to educate and enroll employees in benefit programs. Using online portals to create a resource library is a great way to help answer employee questions about company programs while keeping them informed with updates and newsletters.

This provides a one-stop experience for education on policies, forms, and important information in which employees can access at any time.

Since the Affordable Care Act, employers have put a lot more focus on encouraging workers to get more involved in company health care programs to help control costs. Using virtual care software is a great way to gain insight from employees to find a benefit package that fits their needs to plan for the future.

As the professional world is becoming increasingly transparent, workers like having access to all their information such as how their paychecks are allocated in accordance to taxes and the benefits. In the past, this meant going through a mountain of paperwork for HR reps.

Now, with payroll technology, employees have easy access to all this information. Automatic record keeping makes sure all the information is organized and up to date for the employee’s convenience.

Engagement

engagement

Cloud and mobile technology plays a huge role in providing information and feedback from workers so companies can make proper changes. Especially as millennials begin to flood the workplace, employee engagement is becoming more and more important.

A company’s ability to actively assess this information is crucial in retaining a young workforce.

Young professionals want to be engaged in their company. Using interactive technology is a great way to give voices to the employees so HR can assess results to show what motivates people and what doesn’t. Based on this information, companies are able to adjust their model to keep everyone producing their best work.

Training

Advancements in information technology have made it simple to train new employees more efficiently. New hires are able to access digital training programsremotely which eliminates the need for professionals to take time away from their work to train the newcomers. There is no denying that human interaction in the training process is necessary as there are a lot company practices that simply cannot be taught by a computer.

However, virtual training programs make it easy for human resources reps to train a larger number of new hires and track progress through computerized testing. Employees will be able to ask more questions when they are in the field which will consume a lot less of the experienced workers’ time.

Performance Management

performance_mgmt

Performance management has seen a great deal of enhancement in the digital age. Employee performance can now be easily tracked and analyzed for the benefit of the company. HR can use data and metrics to examine a worker’s performance by pinpointing issues and providing accurate feedback. Employee performance programs can help identify those who do not match up to company standards and find out if they require additional training or need to be let go.

As the digital and professional world evolves, human resources are becoming more and more efficient. With millennials making up over half of the workforce. HR must keep up and build on technological advances to manage both employee expectations and business requirements.

Great post by  via http://tech.co

Comments Off on 6 Reasons to Move to New York City

6 Reasons to Move to New York City

Posted by | 12 January, 2012 | Business planning, Startups, Tech City, Trends

Original post by dave zohrob

New York City lacks the startup density of Silicon Valley, but there are plenty of reasons to start your next company here:

1. A great (and growing) startup scene. Soho, Union Square and the Flat­iron district form the new Silicon Alley, where you’ll have your pick of compa­nies, meetups and events. Great star­tups are doing great work here across indus­tries—in­cluding tumblrfoursquare10gen,Betaworksturntable.fmEtsySkillshare, and Harvest, among others 1. New York also has a sizable angel and VC commu­nity 2.

2. Bubble-free. SF often feels like a company town; in contrast, New York is a national hub for publish­ing, adver­tis­ing, fash­ion, food, and finance, to name a few. Being in the center of all these indus­tries is inspir­ing, and your startup can take advan­tage of this diver­sity.

3. The singles scene. Some folks might rank this as #1; I’m trying not to assume too much. But if you’re a single straight guy or gal in SF or Moun­tain View, you (or a friend) have likely complained about the singles scene in the Bay Area.

Forbes ranks New York as the best city for singles, putting it above San Fran­cisco, which clocks in at #7 3. For single guys, the numbers don’t lie—there are 210,820 more single women than men in the New York metropol­itan area, while the Bay Area boasts a surplus of 65,000 men. 4

Plus, being a hack­er/en­tre­pre­neur is more unique in New York—telling someone you make iPhone apps elicits inter­est, not eye-rolls. (Try it.)

4. Official support. Mayor Bloomberg wants to turn New York into a tech hub, and city offi­cials reach out to local entre­pre­neurs. The NYC Economic Development Corporation offers great resources including info on city incen­tives and discounted office space for star­tups.

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Comments Off on The crowfunding revolution kickstarts a new economic hope

The crowfunding revolution kickstarts a new economic hope

Posted by | 3 January, 2012 | Business models, Finance, Startups, Trends

original post by  via siliconrepublic

The crowfunding revolution kickstarts a new economic hope

The crowfunding revolution kickstarts a new economic hope

Inspired by the success of funds like Kickstarter in the US, the crowdfunding revolution in 2011 broke onto the shores of Europe and for a country like Ireland battling to reinvent itself and fight its way out of recession, the business model has achieved tremendous success in just one year.

I first heard of crowdfunding a year and a half ago when a little known group of software programmers in New York wanted to create a new open social network called Diaspora.

Crowdfunding happens when a new venture puts out a call for support from ordinary people and if it achieves its goal will provide supporters with privileges when the venture goes live. It could be a filmmaker trying to make a movie, a musician trying to record a concept album, or a new web venture trying to get lift off. In the case of Diaspora in just 12 days it raised US$200,000 from 6,000 backers, including Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Early this year I became acquainted with an initiative by Business to Arts to create an Irish crowdfunding venture aimed at supporting individual giving to the creative sector, making healthy use of offline and online networks like Facebook in the process.

After just eight months of going live, over €340,000 of new income has been generated by the Fundit.ie initiative for creative projects in Ireland, with contributions from over 7,400 people. In its end of year statement Fundit reported:

  • 94 projects fully funded
  • 141 projects have been live on the site so far
  • €402,000 pledged on the site in total
  • 7,580 pledges
  • Average pledge amount is €53.29 (though this changes all the time and is different for every project!)
  • €340,000 paid out to project creators to date
  • €16,178 commission to Fund it on successful projects
  • Number of failed projects so far is 28

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Comments Off on World’s Fastest Growing Ecommerce CompanyFab.Com Closes $40M Investment Round

World’s Fastest Growing Ecommerce CompanyFab.Com Closes $40M Investment Round

Posted by | 27 December, 2011 | Business models, Finance, Startups, Trends

Original post by LINDSAY ONEAL via tech.li

Just six months after launching, Fab.com announced yesterday the closing of $40 million in Series B financing led by investment firm Andreessen Horowitz.

Fab’s agressive pre-launch strategy helped the flash-sale design site gain traction quickly, acquiring 1.2 million members and earning the title of the “World’s Fastest Growing Ecommerce Company.”

Founded by Jason Goldberg and Bradford Shellhammer, Fab offers members high-brown collection of design sales across a spectrum of categories.To date Fab members have purchased 500,000 products from the site with 100,000 orders being purchased in November alone. Fab’s success is an impressive example of the power of social commerce as more than 50% of Fab.com’s 1.2 million members have come from social sharing.

While membership to Fab is free, the company maintains invitation-only access “in order to maintain exceptional prices.”  In addition to Horowitz, existing investors also contributed to the round including: Menlo Ventures, First Round Capital, Baroda Ventures, SoftTech VC, and Ashton Kutcher.

Video: Bradford Shellhammer, co-founder of Fab.com demos some items for the site’s “100+ Best Design Gifts Under $100″

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Comments Off on How to Make Your Startup Go Viral The Pinterest Way

How to Make Your Startup Go Viral The Pinterest Way

Posted by | 7 December, 2011 | Business models, Business planning, Finance, Startups, Trends

Original post by STEVE CHENEY via TC

Take a look at Pinterest’s one-year traffic on Compete from Oct 2010 to Oct 2011, which is the picture in this post, and shows Pinterest rising from 40,000 to 3.2 million monthly unique visitors. I took both ends of this chart and estimated monthly compounded growth over Pinterest’s lifetime, then interpolated the curve using constant growth and put the results in this Google Spreadsheet.

Backing out of Compete’s numbers, we see Pinterest grew about 50% month over month from a base of zero since its inception (on average, smoothing the curve). Today growth is catching fire, as evidenced by the near doubling of traffic last month, and Pinterest’s page views growing 20X since June, according to comScore.

Note these numbers are approximations and also do not count the significant traffic the service sees from mobile (Pinterest’s app currently takes the #6 social spot in the iTunes store). Also my guess is that a lot of its unique visitors arrive out of network (from Facebook / Twitter), and many of these uniques leave Pinterest without registering (more on this below) so it’s tough to know their exact user numbers.

But let’s play pretend and use the data we have to do some projections on where Pinterest could be a year from today.  Its recent VCs certainly did this, and decided to give the startup a $200M+ valuation.  Ron Conway said recently that Pinterest is growing like Facebook did in 2006. Facebook actually grew from 14 million uniques to 26 million uniques from May 2006 to May 2007, then a year and half later they had rocketed to 140 million uniques, and were growing at about 20 million uniques per month. So monthly growth early on for Facebook was around 10-15%.

Can Pinterest really sustain its wild 45% monthly growth? No, unless it’s destined to be the fastest growing startup in history. However, we can be pretty sure Pinterest has hit a tipping point… their page view numbers are simply insane. If they were to grow 20% month/month over the next year, Pinterest would be at 30 million uniques a year from today. And with 25% month/month growth, they’d be at 50 million.  These are pure guesses, but Ron’s statements and last month’s growth make this look possible, so let’s examine virality and Pinterest’s underlying fundamentals.

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Comments Off on When Should Your E-Commerce Startup Go Global?

When Should Your E-Commerce Startup Go Global?

Posted by | 2 December, 2011 | Business models, Business planning, Finance, Startup marketing, Startups, Strategy, Trends

Original post by Leighton Peter Prabhu via web-translations

Selling online has enormous advantages over a traditional business model.The main one is the ability to be instantly global, in the sense that your website can be accessed by anyone, anywhere, anytime. However, very few e-businesses take a global approach from the outset or even seriously consider harnessing this potential once they have reached scale in their home market.

blue-globe-trolleyMost companies I speak with need convincing that there is a meaningful benefit to going global, i.e. addressing markets other than their home market. It’s particularly prevalent in companies based in Anglophone countries – mainly the US and UK – so much so that I’ve actually given up trying to promote the Russian e-business market to them.

Looking at the great success stories like Amazon, eBay, Google and Facebook, their global ambitions are now quite clear. It’s also clear that if they had started much earlier, they would have secured leading market positions in more key international markets, especially in the emerging-market BRIC countries.

The standard argument is that smaller companies lack the technical, financial and managerial resources to reach into global markets. However, in e-commerce businesses these issues are much narrower in scope than they would be for a traditional business. The more likely reason is that e-businesses tend to be founded by younger and inexperienced people (not only in business but also in life), who have not had time to gain exposure to international business. And when such companies get larger and start bringing in professional managers, the pool they draw from is very thin in international experience. It’s only at the very upper echelons of firm size that they consciously seek globally-experienced managers. By then, in many cases, it’s too late.

Speaking about resources, entering emerging markets through joint ventures, selling agents or other forms of partnerships are the most effective strategies. Not only are you benefiting from working with an expert in the local market, but that expert can add value to your entire enterprise, not just the local operation. New ideas, new connections, new ways of thinking and even creative adaptions of your product or service are all things that can be applied to improve your entire company. For example, when we launched Shoes of Prey in Russia, we offered the same level of customer care that was extended to all global customers (i.e. only online or telephone contact). But when we started offering in-person consultations, our conversion rate skyrocketed. This experience has convinced the main company to extend their international presence to more cities and also offer in-person consultations in the Sydney head office.

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Comments Off on When Should Your E-Commerce Startup Go Global?

When Should Your E-Commerce Startup Go Global?

Posted by | 2 December, 2011 | Business models, Business planning, Finance, Startup marketing, Startups, Strategy, Trends

Original post by Leighton Peter Prabhu via web-translations

Selling online has enormous advantages over a traditional business model.The main one is the ability to be instantly global, in the sense that your website can be accessed by anyone, anywhere, anytime. However, very few e-businesses take a global approach from the outset or even seriously consider harnessing this potential once they have reached scale in their home market.

blue-globe-trolleyMost companies I speak with need convincing that there is a meaningful benefit to going global, i.e. addressing markets other than their home market. It’s particularly prevalent in companies based in Anglophone countries – mainly the US and UK – so much so that I’ve actually given up trying to promote the Russian e-business market to them.

Looking at the great success stories like Amazon, eBay, Google and Facebook, their global ambitions are now quite clear. It’s also clear that if they had started much earlier, they would have secured leading market positions in more key international markets, especially in the emerging-market BRIC countries.

The standard argument is that smaller companies lack the technical, financial and managerial resources to reach into global markets. However, in e-commerce businesses these issues are much narrower in scope than they would be for a traditional business. The more likely reason is that e-businesses tend to be founded by younger and inexperienced people (not only in business but also in life), who have not had time to gain exposure to international business. And when such companies get larger and start bringing in professional managers, the pool they draw from is very thin in international experience. It’s only at the very upper echelons of firm size that they consciously seek globally-experienced managers. By then, in many cases, it’s too late.

Speaking about resources, entering emerging markets through joint ventures, selling agents or other forms of partnerships are the most effective strategies. Not only are you benefiting from working with an expert in the local market, but that expert can add value to your entire enterprise, not just the local operation. New ideas, new connections, new ways of thinking and even creative adaptions of your product or service are all things that can be applied to improve your entire company. For example, when we launched Shoes of Prey in Russia, we offered the same level of customer care that was extended to all global customers (i.e. only online or telephone contact). But when we started offering in-person consultations, our conversion rate skyrocketed. This experience has convinced the main company to extend their international presence to more cities and also offer in-person consultations in the Sydney head office.

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Comments Off on Brian Solis on Five Common Social Media Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Brian Solis on Five Common Social Media Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Posted by | 25 November, 2011 | Key lessons, Social media, Strategy, Trends

Original post by SHIRA LAZAR via Entrepreneur

 

Brian Solis is known to many in the tech scene as a man about town. He’s a social media connoisseur, speaker, author and is currently a principal analyst at the research firm, Altimeter Group.

While his first book, Engage, covered how brands and businesses can use social media to build communities and support in the online ecosytem, his latest The End of Business As Usual covers the consumer revolution and what industries need to do to “rewire” their business models.

Digital disruption seems to be hitting every business right now, but it’s also causing many to thrive. Here, Solis offers five tips on how to avoid common social media mistakes:

1. Showing up isn’t enough. Customers and prospects are busy, connected and interacting with everybody but you today. While creating a presence is a start, it is how you engage with people that attracts them to you. This requires an engagement program — that is, a plan for using social media to meet goals — that extends beyond the typical marketing of “follow us on Twitter” or “Like us on Facebook.”

2. You can’t be everywhere, nor should you. Many entrepreneurs are excited about technology and they overextend themselves because they want to be part of the latest trend. The key is to only be where your customers, prospects and those who influence them engage.

READ 3 to 5 HERE  

Comments Off on Amex earmarks $100m for investment in digital commerce startups

Amex earmarks $100m for investment in digital commerce startups

Posted by | 10 November, 2011 | Finance, Startup marketing, Startups, Trends

Original post by finextra

Credit card giant American Express has set up a $100 million fund to invest in digital commerce startups.

Amex, like rivals Visa and MasterCard, says it recognises that the payments industry is undergoing fundamental change as commerce moves online.

To help fend off competition from the likes of PayPal and Google, as well as a raft of new entrants, last year it acquired the Revolution Money platform and used it as the basis of a digital payment and commerce offering called Serve.

The firm has also made a number of other digital moves, cutting a deal with Facebook, filing a patent for a system and method for using loyalty rewards as a currency, investing in mobile outfit Payfone and buying Sometrics, a virtual currency vendor.

Now it is promising a “multi-year digital commerce initiative designed to help identify and develop innovative technologies that will help accelerate the company’s digital transformation and strengthen connections to a growing base of customers around the globe”.

As well as earmarking $100 million for investment, an office has been established in Silicon Valley from which the initiative will be managed by Harshul Sanghi, who was recently appointed as managing partner, enterprise growth group. Sanghi previously ran Motorola Mobility Ventures.

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Comments Off on Blog: Tech Weekly Tech City Talks #2

Blog: Tech Weekly Tech City Talks #2

Posted by | 29 October, 2011 | Business models, Business planning, Finance, Startup reading lists, Strategy, Tech City, Trends

Original post by TechCity UK

The second of the Guardian Tech Weekly Podcast talks on Tech City took place on Monday evening, this time focusing on the issue of innovation and entrepreneurship and looking at ‘what government, investors and the people at the coalface believe is necessary to inspire innovation and to generate globally competitive enterprise’.

As with the recent debate on skills, the panel and the audience (and Twitter) engaged in a lively debate which covered off a  variety of topics around the issue of how best to encourage and foster an environment in which innovation and entrepreneurship are second nature.The podcast is now live and available to listen to or download here, but in the meantime we’ve summarised some of the key points raised below. Please note that it is intended to be an indication of the lines of argument rather than a verbatim transcript – those seeking quotes should refer to the podcast itself.

This week’s panel consisted of:

The inherent individuality of businesses, particularly in the creative industries, and as such the difficulties involved in finding a strategy which can assist all of them within an area / cluster, regardless of size. Key to doing this is to establish a rapport / dialogue with local community businesses to establish their goals and needs. This has worked well in Brighton over the past decade, especially in terms of the gaming industry, which drove the development of the South Coast’s technology cluster by choosing the city as its home (Tara Solesbury)
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