Hiring

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IN GOOD HANDS

You are in good hands with us – as our high positions in various rankings and benchmark analyses testify. According to the careers studies undertaken by trendence, we have repeatedly been confirmed as one of the top employers in Germany and Europe in the categories of “Graduate Barometer”, “Young Professional Barometer” and “Student Barometer”. We also scored well in the “Universum Survey”. In 2016, we were again amongst the top 100 employers.

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Prizes and certificates may be nice to have – but what really matters to us is the goal itself: we know that success is founded on the efforts of our employees. To continue writing this success story, we afford our employees the greatest freedom of expression, attractive prospects and potential to advance their careers. We enjoy making this investment – and it pays off for us all.

FASCINATION ON EVERY LEVEL

On whichever level you start – with us you will be part of one of Europe’s most innovative media corporations. Take a look at our wide-ranging portfolio and you will soon realize that there is no shortage of interesting links: from SAT.1, ProSieben, kabeleins, sixx, SAT.1 Gold, ProSieben MAXX and kabel eins doku, the TV stations, via ProSiebenSat.1 Networld to maxdome, Germany’s biggest online video store and ProSiebenSat.1 Games with platforms likealaplaya, ProSiebenGames, Sat1Spiele and browsergames.

PIONEERING SPIRIT FROM THE VERY FIRST DAY

You will see that our environment fosters creativity and demands innovative ideas. True to our motto “we think ahead, whilst others are lost in thought” we seek out personalities with a strong desire to create, ambitious and courageous enough to be in the vanguard always.

PROMOTING INNOVATION    

Martin Krautsieder

Martin Krautsieder

Each year we bestow the “Allstars Award” on employees for special achievements. Martin Martin (form. Krautsieder) was one of the recipients in 2013. He developed a market research tool which enables questions to be put to viewers directly via television.

SUPPORT AND SERVICE

“Yes we care” – a slogan with real meaning at ProSiebenSat.1. Our careful balance between professional and private life is maintained through flexible models of work and dedicated support services. We have among others our own day care centre and a broad sports programme. In the case of special help being required in organizing daily life, we call on pme Familienservice, a specialist provider of care solutions for work and family.

FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

We love dynamic change – and your further development is especially important to us. The ProSiebenSat.1 Academy offers a varied, innovative programme of further education and training. Additional support comes in the form of talent and newcomer monitoring, helping to plan your individual short-term, mid- and long-term development within the company.

DIVERSITY IN EVERY RESPECT

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Diversity is the order of the day at ProSiebenSat.1 – and that goes for our staff too. Indeed, it is the diverse mix of personalities which makes us what we are: “Fascinating People” whose ideas, different perspectives and experiences entertain millions of people every day. We believe that the future success of a modern company will largely depend on how it promotes and utilizes diversity. One important point in this regard is the ratio of men to women in the company and in management roles. We have already achieved good results in this area: male and female full-time employees are almost equal in number. 30 per cent female representation at management level is also well above average. Colleagues from a wealth of different nations work for us and we are unequivocally in favour of every form of diversity.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE FUTURE

We are not just entertainers: Thanks to our popularity we are fortunate to be in a position to interest young people in particular in important social topics: we want to create opportunities, promote culture, communicate values and build knowledge. Within these four areas we have established a range of projects and activities to make our contribution as a media corporation to Corporate Social Responsibility.

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Are you up for a unique challenge, with a chance to use your skills in a fast paced environment, where you work hard, wear many hats, and commit all your energy to an idea that has only a one out of four chance of success?

If so, then working at a startup company may be for you!

Pros:

Not a job, but a mission – greater feeling of creating something of value
Lack of structure – less hierarchy, fewer rules, more casual work hours
More room for creativity and entrepreneurial spiritStartup Fair
Perks can include working from home, free food, open leave policy
Potential stock options – ownership in the company
Promotion opportunities to leadership roles easier and faster
Results of your work are immediate, and rewarding
Multiple roles, so gain valuable and diverse skills
You help define company culture
Generally fewer politics, more camaraderie

Cons:

Uncertainty, risk – there is no guarantee the company will be successful
Pay and benefits may not be as good, at least initially
Pay structure may be different; you may receive a stipend, or profit sharing options, instead of a set hourly pay rate or annual salary
Less work life balance – heavy work load and long hours
More pressure to perform – smaller workforce so every person factors into company success

What Startups Look For In A Candidate

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Passion & enthusiasm
Intellectual curiosity
Tech smarts
Ability to communicate
Outside projects
Committed to personal growth and learning
Self-starter
Extras – what else have you done

Tips For A Successful Search

Do side projects; develop an app, contribute to an open source project
Learn new technologies (classes and outside; Khan Academy, Coursera, Code.org, Open Courseware)
Demonstrate your passion
Be persistent & patient
Get involved with a campus startup
Participate in a hackathon or makeathon
Showcase your skills; GitHub, personal website, online portfolio, blog
Research startups, focus on those that fit your interests & skills
Personalized contact with CEO, demonstrate passion & interest, detail how you can make an impact

What makes an awesome startup employee?

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You hear people talking about what makes a great startup founder all the time: A great sense of vision, clarity of purpose, relentless drive, a strange balance of over-confidence and insecurity.

There are whole books written about it.

But what makes a great startup team-member? The people who join and thrive in early start startup teams are an equally special breed. In fact, the best startup employees aren’t necessarily the best fit for working in more established businesses – some of the most brilliant startup people I’ve worked with find the traditional business work impossibly frustrating.

“It’s so SLOOOW!”

“I’m just doing the same thing every day – I want to be more in touch with the other stuff going on in the business!”

There are a whole range of attributes that are uniquely suited to these small, high-growth, high pressure companies, but it can be hard for founders who are hiring teams (and people hunting for jobs) to know what those are. So we’ve smooshed together our recruiting AND startup running experience and made a list of the top 8 attributes we’ve found to be the most valuable:

Passion, enthusiasm, motivation for what you’re doing – Must buy into your vision and your big “Why” – what it is you’re trying to do or create in the world. They’ve gotta care about the problem you’re trying to solve, otherwise it’ll be hard to stay motivated.

 Curiosity – They’ve got to love the process of finding better ways to do things – especially when it comes to challenging assumptions about the only way to build products. Being curious about why you’re doing this, who it’s for and how they’re going to use it is vital across all roles in a startup too.

 Pace – They’ve got to be great at making decisions and acting on them quickly. The old adage of succeed quickly or fail fast is the day to day life of a start up. You need people who thrive and are excited by this.

 Fearless/Audacity – try the impossible, challenge more than just the status quo, be prepared to push the boundaries, limits of what we believe

 Grit – /resilience – your resilience will be consistently tested and challenged in a startup. That thing you just spent a month working on? It’s not working, we need to abandon it and try something else. The reality is that it will not be a smooth ride. People who have made it through a few tough life experiences, who have demonstrated Grit, are more likely to survive.

 Hunger and willingness to sacrifice – Founding a startup requires sacrifice. So does working in one. You’re going to get chucked in the deep end often. You’re going to be asked to work longer hours, more often. It’s a high pressure job so you’ve got to be hungry and prepared to make sacrifices.

 Sense Of Humour – You’ve got to be able to laugh and realise that tomorrow is another day. The sun will set, the sun will rise. Late nights, too much pizza and endless bug squashing is only bearable if it’s also fun. You want to be able to laugh with the people you sit next to.

Flexibility – The only constant is change. Get ready to develop skills you don’t have. Although you may be employed for a specific role, the nature of start up means that everyone leans in the direction that the business needs to be focused on at that time. If its sales this month – then get ready to help out in that area. Anyone who defaults to “that’s not in my job description” isn’t suited to a startup life.

Sources: weirdlyhub.com

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You know exactly what company you want to work for, the job you want to do and where you want it to be. The only question remaining is: How do you get there?

Simply sending an application may not be enough. Large companies on average receive thousands of resumes daily.

Before you get overly excited about the prospect of working at your dream job and send that resume to the first email address you find, you have to have a plan.

Make sure you lay the groundwork so your file won’t get lost in the shuffle when the time comes to showcase your amazing professional profile.

Here’s a five-step action plan to help you land your dream job at your dream company:

1. Research and Know What the Company Is Looking For

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You may already know your dream company backwards and forwards, even what the C-suite looks like. Still, it doesn’t hurt to make sure your research is as thorough as it can be.

This will help you build a strong base for the personal brand you’re going to build to send their way.

One thing you’ll learn in business is that there is always more to learn. So look up resources that can offer you some tips on how best to research companies.

Also, make sure to check out the company’s LinkedIn profile, as well as the chief officers if they are listed. Being this thorough will make that interview you get showcase your genuine passion and enthusiasm for the position.

2. Build Your Professional Brand

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Now that you’ve studied up on your dream place of employment, apply that knowledge to building your professional brand. This brand is the career narrative you want to create for yourself in order to stand out from the crowd.

Remember, unless you’re meticulous, silly things like typos can send your application straight into the trash.

Respondents to a 2013 survey by Career Builder cited that 58 percent of applicants’ resumes contained typos and 36 percent were generic and not specifically focused toward the position being applied for.

It’s so important to make sure this is part of your professional brand creation. If you’re unsure of how to begin, look into resume writing services that specialize in various industries to help get you started on the right foot.

This is especially important the higher up you get. If you’re at the managerial or executive level, getting help with your resume is just as important as when you were in college.

A resume writer specializing in executive resumes can help you build a note-worthy, accomplishment-focused, strategic resume that can get you an 85 percent higher response rate and increased salary in nine out of 10 cases.

Also, think about building an online narrative if that suits the position you are applying for. Take Nina Mufleh and her quest to land a job at Airbnb. Her unique approach garnered national attention.

She focused on what she could bring to the table with the company rather than previous professional experience. She illustrated how she would be a great fit for her dream company and why, all in a unique way.

She found the best way to market and pitch herself.

You can do the same. There are many ways to do it, even some unorthodox ones, it’s just a matter of understanding what your dream company is looking for and how you can apply that to your own professional brand.

3. Reach Out to Individuals in the Company

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You have your knowledge and your professional brand ready to be shown to the world. Now, the next step is to reach and connect with individuals already working within the company.

Perhaps you’ve already started working on your network or have a friend working for your dream employer. Wonderful! This will simplify the process of getting your foot in the door.

However, if you don’t have those established connections yet, don’t worry.

Read up on the best ways to connect with HR managers or recruiters, and dive deep into networking with the company’s employees on LinkedIn. This is a great platform to open dialogue and begin cultivating relationships with individuals you may work with in the future.

In fact, 89 percent of recruiters have hired someone via LinkedIn. Ask questions and be curious.  They will most likely be glad to offer their professional advice.

Don’t be afraid to ask them for an informational interview. Whether it’s a quick chat over the phone or a lengthy meeting over lunch, you’ll be able to get the insider’s look at how things really function in the workplace.

It’ll also give you an opportunity to showcase your excitement and enthusiasm to someone already established within the company. Be sure to plan ahead with questions to ask.

You won’t want to forget any of your important questions, and you’ll also want to make sure you’re prepared for anything they might fire back at you.

4. Tailor Your Application to Fit Their Needs

It’s now time to actually apply for the position. Your carefully laid groundwork is going to pay off. Push your creative juices to the maximum, and try to acquire the name of whose hands your application and resume has to find.

An inside referral, that informational interview paid off, will make your chances even better of that happening.

Now, before you hit the send button, you’ve got to write that smashing cover letter. Always keep your professional brand in mind.

It’s what makes you, you, and you know you’re the best fit for this company. Be sure to illustrate that.

5. Now … Send It

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Send that application off on its way. You’re now one step closer to landing your dream job. You’ve laid the groundwork, took time to set yourself apart from the rest of the crowd, networked your behind off and meticulously filled out your application.

Now get ready to see the fruits of your labor.

Great post by  via http://www.business.com

How can Techmeetups.com help you ?

Delivering Startup Happines www.techmeetups.com

We help Startups through Events like Meetups, Workshops, Hackathons, Job Fairs, Events Promo and also have www.techstartupjobs.com to help you recruit your tech team. 

Explore Techmeetups events in Berlin, Paris, London, Barcelona, Amsterdam, New York, Vienna, Lisbon, Madrid

Whether you are looking for a job or recruiting Tech Startup Job Fair is the place to be!

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If you’re planning to look for a new job this year, you’re not alone.

Which might leave you wondering: How, exactly, does one get noticed in a crowded, motivated pool of applicants? Sure, you can read the job description, but how can you know what hiring managers are really looking for?  Which applicants stand out from a stack of resumes?  Which sail through the interview process? And — most importantly — how can you be one of those successful candidates?

We figured the best way to find out would be go to the source itself, so we sat down with HR pros and hiring managers at 11 top tech companies that partner with The Muse, like HBO, Comcast, Homeaway and Eventbrite and got some intel on what they’re looking for in 2016.

Some of what we learned was obvious: Tech jobs are booming (you may have heard?), and today’s companies are looking for people who aren’t only masters of their craft, but passionate about their work and their employer.

But we also found something surprising: Many of the qualities hiring managers are after seem to contradict each other. For instance, employers want people who think like entrepreneurs and have a take-charge mindset — but who also learn from others and play nice on the team. They want employees who are confident in their skills and accomplishments — but who also remain humble in what they don’t know.

In these cases, showing off both sets of skills may seem challenging (or leave you wondering how one person could possibly check all the boxes). But fear not. We’ve broken down what we learned and translated what you need to do to strike the perfect balancing act into 8 rules for getting hired in 2016.

Here they are — complete with tips straight from the mouths of hiring managers.

1. Prove you can hit the ground running, then learn along the way

Regardless of the position, we look for candidates who posses a results-driven way of looking at things. We identified the traits that the most successful people at our company possess, something we call the Success Formula, and we are able to structure interview questions that will really gauge if a candidate will succeed here. No matter what skills we are hiring them for, they need to be able to show metrics around how they define success. Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson

No matter what your skill set, companies want to feel confident that you’re an expert at it (at least to the level necessary for the role you’re applying to). In most cases, employers aren’t hiring you to train you — they’re hiring you to jump in and do the job.

So, leave hiring managers with no question that you’re ready to do just that. For every job you’re applying to, read the responsibilities and skills listed on the job description carefully, and then tailor your resume and prepare stories for your interview that show you fit the bill. Too many people expect prospective employers to read between the lines of their experience — and get their resumes tossed in the “no” pile. Instead, be deliberate about showing the hiring manager that you’ve successfully done this job before, and are ready to do it again.

That said, organizations want to feel comfortable that you’d be able to adapt to their preferences, new tools on the market or just better ways of doing things.

They want to know you’re sure of your ways, but not set in them. “We look for life-long learners, who are always in pursuit of growth in their career and personal development,” shares Julia Hartz, president and co-founder of Eventbrite. “In many ways, a skilled engineer is always learning. They are eager to adapt and adopt new skills and languages,” adds Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru.An easy way to show this? Share an anecdote of a time you changed your ways because of something new you learned or adapted what you know to the situation at hand. You can also illustrate that you’re open to different ways of doing things by inquiring about the methods of the company you’re interviewing with. For example, after sharing how you approached growing an email subscriber base, ask the hiring manager what her approach has been up until this point. Not only will it show how interested you are in the company (more on that below), it’ll hint at an interest in learning from the people around you.

2. Be ready to show off cross disciplinary skill sets

At a quickly growing startup like The Muse, our diverse teams work incredibly closely with each other. So we look for people who can easily collaborate with people outside of their skill set: developers who understand the broader business side of things, for example, or non-technical people who can communicate with product and engineering in an effective way. Kathryn Minshew, CEO and co-founder of The Muse

This probably won’t come as a shock, but tech skills are in high demand. A full 100% of the hiring managers we talked to cited engineers as the number one hires they’re looking to make this year — and this demand isn’t slowing down anytime soon. The Bureau of Labor statistics anticipate a 22% growth in software engineering roles from 2012 to 2022 — twice the average growth of other roles. “First, Android and iOS developers roles are huge for us, and hard to hire for. Second, we need Software Development Engineers in Test (SDETs), folks who are traditionally software developers, but develop test frameworks. We’re also looking for full stack developers who focus on frontend and middleware. Finally, we need site reliability engineers — people who can help us get a system up and running,” shares Jessica Sant, senior director of software development and engineering at Comcast, of the hires they’re in need of.

So if you’re a developer, ride the wave, baby. Know how to nail the technical interview so you can show off exactly what you’re able to do, and make an effort to highlight some desirable soft skills — like decisiveness, adaptability, and communications skills — as well the ones that make you stand out from the competition. “I want a well-rounded engineer with hard technical skills, but also really great communication skills. Someone who can get their point across and break it down for a variety of audiences, someone who can collaborate with a cross-functional team and innovate,” shares Sant.

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IMAGE: ARIEL SKELLEY/BLEND IMAGES/CORBIS

That said, companies obviously need more than engineers: Employers cited sales, product management, operations, digital and growth marketing, and business and strategy as other in-demand roles.

Regardless of your specialty, however, the quality of the hour is cross-disciplinary. Employers want to know that you can not only collaborate with a team of people from different departments, but that you can think like them to make working together easier and help your work fit in with larger company goals.

This comes down to learning about functions outside of your own. If you’re technical, look for ways to get involved with and learn more about the business at large. And if engineering’s not in your background — or future? You can still make an effort to know a little bit about the field. Take a free online course or look for opportunities to integrate learning tech into your current job.

Then, don’t miss the opportunity to share that knowledge with hiring managers; even a few quick resume lines about your experience or interest in a field different from your primary one can be enough to whet the hiring manager’s appetite.

3. Be obsessed with the company and the field

The most important quality we look for is a passion for our business: they know what we do and they are excited about the opportunity to come work with us. Stephani Martin, VP of people & culture at Boost Media

You probably want a job that’s about more than just the paycheck. Similarly, employers want to hire people who are there because they love what the company is doing — not just because they need any old job. We heard time and time again from employers just how critical it is to show off why you’re dying to work for them, specifically.

How can you do this without coming off as a superfan or stalker? You don’t need to show up wearing company swag, tweet at the CEO every day or spend the interview gushing about the product. Instead, show off how much you love the company by using your knowledge of it to give a sense of how you’d step into the role. For example, you might mention a time you used the product and a challenge you had with it — and describe how you think you could alleviate that in your role.

“Doing this shows the hiring manager you’re interested in not only the brand, but also working for the brand. You understand the problems, needs and voice, and you have the skills needed to turn that knowledge into results,” says The Muse‘s Robyn Melhuish.

But you should also have interest — and ideally expertise! — in the industry you’re applying to at large. For example, you may love the idea of working for HBO based on your obsession with Game of Thrones, but can you bring enough insider knowledge to help them succeed?

“We recommend that all candidates do their research around industry trends before coming in to interview for any position,” says a talent acquisition specialist at HBO. “It’s great to be familiar with HBO shows, but having a depth of knowledge around the industry as a whole is key. Being able to articulate the bigger picture or sharing thoughts on how a company can stay ahead and innovate helps candidates stand out.”The ideal hire for a company is someone who’s an expert both in her craft and in the field she’s applying it to, so if you’re not already keeping up with industry reading, researching what competitors are doing, engaging with experts on social media and regularly talking shop with like-minded folks, start now! It will give you great talking points to help you prove you’re in the know during the interview, and also show hiring managers your dedication to the industry when they inevitably Google you.

4. Show you’re self-driven but can also play nice on a team

The ideal candidate sees the value in collaboration and can stand behind the belief that everyone has experience that you can learn from. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

Today, everyone needs to be an entrepreneur — or at least have the mindset of one — and companies want to hire people who are going to take ownership of projects without having to be babysat every step of the way. And this isn’t just a philosophy of startups that need people like this to survive — larger organizations are embracing the entrepreneurial ideas of moving faster and innovating more, too. “It is all about ownership versus administration,” shares Sledge of Sailthru. “Candidates who lead the charge, having innovated, designed and architected systems, deployed setups, etc. are exactly what we are looking for.”

To show this off to hiring managers, you’ll want to make sure to highlight three things: the fact that you’re a self starter, your capacity for creative thinking and your ability to work in a fast-paced environment with a lot on your plate. Career specialist Aja Frost has tips for highlighting each of these qualities in your resume; you can also pull out anecdotes that exemplify these traits in your cover letter and interview answers. Was there a time you noticed a problem, came up with a creative solution and then took the initiative to implement it in addition to your other work? Make sure you share that story.

 

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But just because you can do things on your own doesn’t mean you always should, and seeing as many companies we talked to attributed their most creative ideas to collaboration, they want to be absolutely sure that you’ll be great at working on teams to make amazing things happen.

In fact, some companies value this so much that they’ll specifically test for it in the interview. ThoughtWorks, a software design company based in San Francisco, for example, gives candidates a pair programming challenge with a current employee. This exercise “serves the purpose of allowing us to understand whether a candidate works collaboratively and how they react to feedback,” shares Laura Nash, recruitment marketing manager. “A candidate that is excited about feedback and is able to adapt as they go demonstrates the open-mindedness and passion we desire.”

So, make sure to show off your team-playership, too. when talking about a big success you had, make sure to mention the other people you collaborated with; when talking about a time you failed, explain the experience of getting feedback from you boss and how you took that moving forward. Oh, and be nice to everyone you meet, from the people in the elevator with you to the receptionist. This is a basic — but telling — sign to employers of how you’ll treat your colleagues day to day.

5. Show passion for your work and your personal life

We also place a lot of emphasis on what a candidate does outside of work, what their hobbies and pastimes are, and their volunteer activities. David O’Connor, senior recruiting manager at Dolby

Companies these days want passionate, inspired employees — not ones who are just clocking in and out. And few things are better determiners of that than truly loving the work that you do.

If that’s not how you feel about jobs you’re applying to, it might be worth considering a career pivot. But if you do, then let it show! Let yourself get genuinely excited when talking about the job.

Let yourself geek out when talking through a particularly tough problem in the technical interview or when presetting ideas for community strategy. Real enthusiasm is obvious — and energizing to hiring managers — so don’t feel like you need to stifle it in the name of being “professional.”Also, show off ways you engage with your career of choice even outside what’s expected of you in your 9-to-5. “Things like writing books, speaking at conferences, or maintaining a blog show us that a candidate is really invested in tech, and it’s more than just a job,” shares Laura Nash, recruitment marketing manager at ThoughtWorks. One easy-but-effective approach: Create an eye-catching personal website that shares some of your related side projects, speaking gigs or volunteer work in addition to your on-the-job accomplishments. “Think ‘show’ instead of ‘tell’ whenever possible: share YouTube videos of a talk you led or a link to a working application you created,” adds Nash.

Of course, in a world where culture and tight-knit relationships are increasingly important to companies, it’s important for the people interviewing you to like you as a person, to want to bring you into their tribe. So they want to learn a little bit about you outside of your work, too! So learn how to be professional — without being boring or totally stifling your personality — in an interview!

“Don’t focus too much on conventional interviewing wisdom which may advise candidates to save personal anecdotes for the end — or to avoid sharing personal stories at all,” says Kimberly Eyhorn, director of global talent acquisition at HomeAway. “Just remember to always bridge the conversation back to your outstanding skills and experience. In a situation where several qualified candidates bring similar levels of value to the table, a hiring manager may be more likely to choose the applicant with whom they had a particularly memorable conversation.”

6. Be specific about your successes and failures

Candidates need to know how to show that they can not only produce results, but how they measure and define success. I’d recommend candidates take a look at past accomplishments and be able to concisely describe how and why they were successful, and back it up with metrics and data points. Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson

Obviously companies want to understand how you’re going to help them succeed, so it’s Job Search 101 to describe your most impressive achievements in your resume and interviews — and make sure to get specific!

Companies don’t just want to hear that you succeeded; they want a sense of the real results you achieved and the steps you took to get there. So don’t just say “I launched a major product” or whatever the success may be — tell the full story. Explain how, the first time you were in charge of a major product launch yourself, you knew you would feel successful if you didn’t just get it out on time, but early, so you dove in immediately, made sure to delegate work smartly and managed to launch a week ahead of schedule. Bonus points if you can quantify these accomplishments to prove you did what you said you did, and did it well.

 

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On the other hand, if you’ve only succeeded and never failed, companies are going to worry about whether you’ll be willing to push yourself (and the company) to try new things. Laura Nash at ThoughtWorks shares, “While we’re always happy to hear of a candidate’s success, the more telling tales that are often skipped are examples of failure… Understanding how someone has learned from a failed attempt at something big and exciting is more interesting to us than a project delivered on-time and on-budget.”

So when faced with a question about your failures, don’t shy away from it. Instead, as we’ve proposed before, pick a real failure, quickly explain what happened, and then spend most of your time talking about how you examined the failure afterward to learn from your mistakes, how you incorporated those lessons moving forward, and how those failures were ultimately able to lead you to other successes down the road.

7. Be just confident enough

The perfect candidate is confident, not only in what they already know but in their capacity to learn something new. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

To make a hiring manager feel confident in you as a candidate, you need to feel confident in yourself and show it! This isn’t just about working through your pre-interview jitters (we hear some power posing can help with that) — it’s about being assured of your skills and your experience and prepared to speak candidly about your areas of growth.

If you tend to hate talking about yourself, we get it — very few of us spend an hour just talking about our accomplishments. If this is you, take career expert Suzanne Gelb’s advice and just think about confidently reporting the facts.

“When you feel confident and good about yourself, you don’t need to magnify your accomplishments or diminish other people’s great work. With a healthy sense of self-pride, you can simply report the facts. No flourishes. No stretching the truth. Just stating who you are and what you’ve done, plain and simple,” she says.Not only will this hopefully help you overcome some fears, it will help you avoid the other end of the spectrum: sounding like you’re cocky or bragging. Companies don’t want someone who thinks they know everything — they want people who are humble about their limitations and excited to learn and grow past them. So don’t be confident to the point of being a know-it-all!

If the interviewer starts talking about something you don’t know, don’t try and fake that you have a background with it — admit that you’ve never heard of that before and ask him or her to explain. When asked about about your biggest weakness, don’t just say something like “perfectionism” and try to move on — share a real challenge you’ve struggled with and ways you’re looking to improve it. If you’re in a technical interview and the hiring manager questions your way of doing things, don’t just push her off — confidently explain your thinking, but also ask how she would have approached the problem.

“Certain skills can be taught, but you have to exhibit the willingness to stretch yourself and to discover your full potential,” adds Kristy Sundjaja, chief of staff and global head of People Group at LivePerson.

8. Focus on your future and don’t worry too much about your past

The perfect candidate is looking forward to what they hope to accomplish next, while maintaining a personal standard of excellence in what they are working on at present. Terrell Sledge, technical recruiter at Sailthru

Yes, companies are hiring you to help them do things and go places, but they also want to understand how this job is going to help you go places and achieve your goals. After all, an engaged employee — one who’s developing professionally consistently on the job — is more likely to stay around for years to come.

And while, you shouldn’t spend your entire application explaining why this job would be so great for your career (the focus there should be on how you can help the company), have a sense of your goals and how this job will fit into them. You can mention this in your cover letter, but it’s going to be more powerful during the interview, when you can weave it into questions such as “Tell me about yourself,” “Where do you see yourself in five years?” and “Why are you leaving your current job?” When it’s your turn to ask questions, ask something like “How does the organization support your professional development and career growth?” to show that it’s something you’re really interested in.

And if you have a winding career path that doesn’t exactly make sense with the future you envision for yourself, there’s good news for you — hiring managers are increasingly open to hiring great people, even if they don’t have exactly the background they expected.

looking-away

IMAGE: HERO IMAGES INC./HERO IMAGES INC./CORBIS

“I like candidates who haven’t had one straight path in their career,” says Stephani Martin, VP of people & culture at Boost Media.

“A dynamic work history shows that they are willing to try new things and seek opportunities outside of their comfort zone.”

Learn how to spin your career change in your favor during your job search, focusing on showing the hiring manager all the things we’ve talked about so far — your transferrable skills, your adaptability, your past successes in a variety of fields, the cross-disciplinary thinking you bring to the table — and then lean into your varied past, knowing that you’re showing off the best of what you have to offer the company.

“The perfect candidate will have a combination of strong technical skills, a sense of pride and ownership in his or her work and a desire to work on a team of highly skilled, passionate people in an effort to make an impact on the business,” sums up Tom Aurelio, SVP of people & culture at Priceline.com — oh, and all the the other things mentioned above. We know it might feel like a lot, but it’s a competitive market, and the more of these qualities you’re able to show off, the more likely it is that you’ll be able to land your dream job.

Great post by ERIN GREENAWALD FOR THE MUSE via http://mashable.com

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Applying for a job in a startup and applying for a job in a corporate, are qualitatively different things. Demands of both are different and the mindset you’d require to perform well at both of them is different.

If you have already decided to work for a startup despite all the hurdles that may await you on your way, here are a few tips about things to avoid saying and doing during your startup job interview process.

Using generic phrases

Phrases like fast learner, strategist, initiator of new initiatives will not work for a startup, at least not for a good one – A good startup will expect people who can communicate clearly what they have done and what past result and achievement makes them eligible in less than 140 characters. If you are still left with space to explain your personality, be my guest.

Jump straight to why can you deliver on that particular job they are advertising? Because you’ve done it before? Because you got the network? Because got the figures? Show them the figures.

happy-workers

“Managing” a team

No startup ever has use of managers people who hope to get things done delegating to others. In a startup everyone ships and there is no hierarchy but a flat hierarchy. Everyone is in the field and everyone delivers something at the end of the day – whether code, content, or customer support calls.

Saying how cool and necessary their startup is for the society

Even if that’s true no good startup will ever hire you for flattering.
The better way is to decide what specifically they are call about and address that particular need. For example – I saw your downloads getting to 10,000 in just 10 days, I can help it jump to a 1,000,000 in 30 days. Or your interface is so cool, I’d love to work on some extra things that will boost your conversion in another 3%.

See? Flatter + actionable in the same pitch

Being a “people” person

I don’t know why people use this so much, what exactly do they try to convey and what will it take to remove it from their dictionary. You say you are a people person who knows how to make it win-win for everyone? Well perfect, in other words you are a great salesman. In that case sell my product to someone in a way he is so happy and delighted with the value he gets for his money that he refers 10 more people to buy. That’s a real people person if you ask me.

Being remorseful about 9-5 jobs

This won’t get you selected, not only because it is cliché nowadays, but because no one works 9-5 anyways. Our smartphones and 3G have permanently taken that privilege from us. Therefore both, the average and the great performers work beyond 9-5 but the difference is what they deliver.

If you can’t showcase what you have achieved even within those hours, your rebellious mind will not sell you to the opportunity. It is not about the 9-5 job and it is not because you are forced to do the same thing every single day. It is rather because you are lazy and unwilling to challenge yourself. Contrary to what the folklore says, no company ever forces people to do the same thing or forbids them to innovate within their own context.

You are looking for more challenging role

No you don’t. Get to the point. Be honest, you will be appreciated for that and save many people’s valuable time. What you need is more money.

If you were looking more challenges you would have found some already. The world is not short of challenges. The very fact that you haven’t shipped or built anything in the past few years is a living proof that challenges is not what you are after. Cut the nonsense.

You have already failed in your own startup

Thank the startup folklore again for making it sound cool for people to brag that they have failed a startup, hence being more powerful and experienced as a result of it. That blog you were running? That doesn’t count as a startup unless you found way to monetize it.

What matters more to those who’d hire you is not the mere fact that you failed in your own startup but that you understand the nature of that failure and why exactly it failed. Demonstrating clarity around this will earn you extra points on your startup job’s application.

Great post by ANJLI JAIN via  www.iamwire.com

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When you’re job searching, take some time to attend job fairs. You’ll have the opportunity to meet with employers that you might not be able to access any other way. Plus, job fairs and career expos often offer networking programs, resume reviews, and workshops for job seekers.

What can you do to compete with the crowds attending job fairs? These tips will help you get ready to attend and maximize your opportunities while you’re there.

Tips for Attending a Job Fair

  • Dress for Success. Attend the job fair dressed for success in professional interview attire, and carry a portfolio. However, do wear comfortable shoes, because you will be standing in line.
  • Practice a Pitch. Practice a quick pitch summarizing your skills and experience so you’re ready to promote your candidacy to prospective employers.
  • Bring Supplies. Bring extra copies of your resume, pens, a notepad, and business cards with your name, your email address, and cell phone number. You might also want to consider bringing “mini resume” cards as an efficient way to sum up your candidacy.
  • Check Out Companies. Many job fairs and career expos have information on participating companies on the job fair web site. Be prepared to talk to hiring managers by checking out the company’s web site, mission, open positions, and general information before you go. If you demonstrate knowledge about each company or manager you’re talking to, you’ll certainly stand out from the crowd.
  • Arrive Early. Keep in mind that lines can be long, so arrive early – before the fair officially opens.
  • Attend a Workshop. If the job fair has workshops or seminars, attend them. In addition to getting job search advice, you’ll have more opportunities to network.
  • Network. While you are waiting in line, talk to others. You never know who might be able to help with your job search. Along the same lines, remember to stay polite and professional. Even if you’re feeling discouraged in your job search, don’t vent to other fair-goers about your situation or about any specific companies. Stay positive and make the most of the opportunity!
  • Show Initiative. Shake hands and introduce yourself to recruiters when you reach the table. Demonstrate your interest in the company and their job opportunities.
  • Be Enthusiastic. Employer surveys identify one of the most important personal attributes candidates can bring to a new position as enthusiasm. This means that employers want to see you smile!
  • Ask Questions. Have some questions ready for the company representatives. The more you engage them, the better impression you’ll make.
  • Collect Business Cards. Collect business cards, so you have the contact information for the people you have spoken with.
  • Take Notes. It’s hard to keep track when you’re meeting with multiple employers in a busy environment. Jot down notes on the back of the business cards you have collected or on your notepad, so you have a reminder of who you spoke to about what.
  • Say Thank You. Take the time to send a brief follow up thank you note or email to the company representatives you met at the job fair. It’s a good way to reiterate your interest in the company and to remind company representatives that you’re a strong candidate.

Great post by Alison Doyle via www.thebalance.com

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It does not come as a surprise: Your organization is only as good as your employees. And your employees are only as good as your talent acquisition (aka recruiting) and talent management philosophy, approach, and team.

We all agree, don´t we?

However, ask yourself, how is your employer handling recruiting in reality? In other words: Are people and talent in your organization at the heart of its mission and strategy or just another cost line in the P&L? Are they as important as the organization´s clients, customers, and objectives? Is senior management doing whatever it takes to recruit exceptional talent to continue building a successful organization?

Fact is, that many companies don´t know how to identify, target, and recruit the talent who is interested in meaningful career moves and which might fit with vacant positions you´re looking for to fill. One key reason being that people in this group are largely passive candidates who need to be contacted at the right point of time with the right message to stimulate them to respond at all.

Find out in this article which trends will shape the future of talent acquisition. Learn how you and your company can locate, recruit, and retain the right candidates better and faster. And how to rock recruiting and your organization in the future to stay successful.

Applying A Strategic Mindset: A top-notch recruiting department establishes itself as a reliant, thought-provoking, equal, and challenging partner of the business and senior management alike. Not only filling vacancies in an transactional manner, but equally important advising business partners on long-term company and employee requirements and strategies. Based on thorough analyses, hard data, and holistic forecasting. Therefore recruiting needs to be perceived by all leaders and managers of the organization as a key function which is owned by everyone; and not only by the recruiters.

 

Masked

Embracing A Marketing Attitude: Marketing departments, more than any other function of the company, have already undergone dramatic change processes with break-neck speed in order to beef up and better understand and serve external customers. In consequence, there is a lot recruiting teams can learn by thinking and acting more like marketers.

Talent As Customers: Organizations should approach talent acquisition in the same sophisticated and dedicated manner as when trying to acquire new customers. Worded differently: “With a high probability there is some sort of customer lifecycle management process installed in your organization. The resulting million dollar question: Is there also a talent lifecycle management system in place?” Let´s face it, there are still (too) many companies who have not really understood that employees are their internal customers. Consequence: “You can´t satisfy and excite your external customers with great products and services, if your internal customers are not motivated, well looked after, and engaged.”

Simplification Of Tech Interaction: Job applicants should experience a state-of-the art application experience which is as good as the organization´s customer experience process. Have you ever thought about e.g. having a highly skilled team in place answering questions of people who think about working for you? Maybe via web video or web chat to keep it scalable? Do you have dedicated metrics and a comprehensive reporting set up to monitor and review the satisfaction levels of your applicants for each step of the interview process?

Strong Employer Brand: Every organization should not only nourish its consumer brand, but also create an attractive employer brand. Key branding principles would need to be applied to the employee experience. For example, a best possible design of a company´s site is of a paramount importance, since there it is where often the job hunting begins. In this respect it´s crucial having a well-designed career site which transports a consistent brand image that reflects the company´s main values. This enables job seekers to define if they might be a cultural fit and if it could make sense to apply. As such companies are well advised taking some time to look at how they’re being reviewed on sites like Glassdoor, Great Place To Work, Vault, etc. Possibly they can incorporate the reviews and learning into their website or any other form of (talent) communication.

The Ultra-Fast Rise Of Technology: Artificial Intelligence (AI) will play a key role in assisting recruiting. I expect that already in some years it´ll be used to help screening candidates resumes based on pre-defined traits, skills, and clues on required management and leadership principles which then will be matched with suitable vacant roles. AI will support recruiters also to assess a candidate´s abilities and behavior (e.g. coping with pressure or working in a team) in real-world scenarios (e.g. with the help of special apps running on computers and mobile devices). It also looks like that the phone call as preferred first-round recruiting means will be soon replaced by live, two-way webcam interviews.

Big Data Powers On: New recruiting screening tools, powered by big data systems, will survey social sites such as Linkedin, Xing or Viadeo (e.g. profile changes, articles published, sudden increase of new contacts, etc.). Top companies will rather rely on quantitative data versus gut instinct. Sites like Joberate already scrape publicly available data from millions of individual online social media accounts and assign a score that estimates the level of job search activity. So if e.g. someone starts making many professional connections on Linkedin, publishes multiple questions or comments on Stack Overflow (with more than 6 million members the world´s largest community of programmers) the scores go up and possibly indicates a lower engagement level, i.e. a higher openness for switching jobs and listening to a recruiter calling at exactly that time.

 

Businessman and woman discussing together while looking at laptop in office

Engagement Beats Sourcing: Often the challenge is no longer finding talent, but activating and engaging them. There are several related strategies organizations should consider. One option is to involve hiring managers earlier in the process, i.e. the recruiting team partnering with them throughout every stage of the talent attraction and recruiting cycle. In top organizations this starts already with hiring managers assisting identifying and sourcing top talent (e.g. via their own alumni or personal networks). Another effective strategy in this context is using gamification. Companies could establish e.g. virtual tournaments to search for top talents (like e.g. the digital start-up Umbel is doing it with its gaming challenge called “Umbelmania”). And, of course, social media has become mainstream for recruiting. New platforms like The Muse give job seekers a more intimate view of and broader insights into company culture, values, communication, and opportunities of multiple organizations.

Data Analytics: Through biometric data and analytics, companies like NextHire can better predict which candidates are most likely to be a good fit for a position. Applicant tracking systems (ATS) – like e.g. Silkroad or Bullhorn which allow to source, attract, engage, screen and hire top talent fast, become a must for any organization. For an excellent overview of leading ATS check here.

Candidate Relationship Management (CRM): A CRM tool does more than tracking candidates like in an ATS. It allows to seamlessly share notes, develop and nurture leads, and document activity across the entire organization. It also can match the company´s internal talent data base with external people aggregator sites such as HiringSolved which gathers data from across the web and filters the most relevant data points and search results.

New Hiring Metrics: Traditionally, recruiters have been evaluated almost exclusively on metrics like time to fill or cost per hires. The problem is that focusing too much on the sheer number of butts they can pull through the hiring funnel and into seats ignore important controls regarding quality of hire, candidate engagement or respective recruiter´s overall impact on organizational recruiting or retention. In the future the entire hiring team will be assessed more by the real value their work generates.

Employees as Ambassadors: There´s nothing more credible than having employees inter-acting with potential future colleagues. Employees participating at external recruiting events, job fairs, conventions, etc. is a first good step. Having them activating their own social networks and alumni sites is an even more powerful and scalable next step. Think about how best to attract e.g. your company followers on Linkedin, Xing, etc. Post engaging and relevant content on your site and blog and motivate employees to share and comment it. By the way, anyone in your team blogging or podcasting about non-confidential and still work-related topics? You might want to get this one kicked off rather quickly.

mjohnson-10-d3-2015-7761-new-tech-visa-supports-northern-powerhouse-and-team-hiring_6115_t12

Influencer Marketing To Recruit: As many companies now use social media to recruit, there’s a mass of online content, tougher competition, and as such it’s harder to differentiate your organization. To cut through the clutter you would need to be in a position to send job seekers clear signals to generate interest and trust. Potential candidates often turn to peers, credible opinion leaders or recognized “voices“ to get information about companies, careers, and job vacancies. Using this technique within recruitment could push you ahead, since the recruiting industry is only about to discover Influencer Marketing.

Humanness Beats Tech: Even, and especially in the digital age, organizations need to radiate a strong human touch, emotions, and warmth. An excellent opportunity for companies to give their organization a “face“ by having employees acting as real and authentic ambassadors (e.g. video tours on company main website, etc.).

Final Thoughts

It goes without saying, that the very central task of recruiting is to anticipate and fill vacancies with the right candidates as soon as possible. That´s the fundamental and transactional mission and obligation of recruiters. At the same time, recruiting is changing rapidly. Job boards and job ads will soon become relicts of the past. Big data, sophisticated matching algorithms, CRM tools, and absolute talent-centricity will influence recruitment more than ever. Recruiting will need to become a key function and department of the organization by taking on more strategic tasks such as long-term staff forecasting, planning, and business advising. Always closely embedded within the overall HR strategy and team and in a tight exchange with all main stakeholders and business partners (e.g. legal, benefit and compensation, tax, etc.).

Recruitment – like the overall management of employees – must be co-owned and carried out by line managers. Organizations that understand and resolve the challenge of candidate engagement e.g. by having various authentic employees communicating and inter-acting with candidates will ultimately prosper. Last, but not least, the better a company develops, looks after, and retains its existing workforce, the smaller the need (and pressure) to recruit new employees.

If you can hire people whose passion intersects with the job, they will manage themselves better than anyone could ever manage them. Their fire comes from within, not from without. Their motivation is internal, not external. Stephen Covey

Great post by Andreas von der Heydt  via www.linkedin.com

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Technology is changing the business world. Human resources is typically a department that is constantly jam-packed with activities. Advancements in technology have done a lot to reduce administrative tasks so HR reps are able to focus on bigger hands-on issues.

A number of HR processes have been made simple by technology with improved accuracy. Here are some of the ways in which technology has changed the landscape of human resources.

Hiring

Before the digital age, the classified ads were the main place to browse job listing and the process involved a heap of paper applications. Then, human resources reps had to screen and test potential candidates to determine who to bring in for an interview. When the process was this complex, multiple interviews were almost always necessary. The biggest problem was that a lot of good candidates would get lost in the long process and look for work elsewhere.

Now, recruiting has been made a lot easier. The process of filling out applications have been made simple and screening is mostly done with automation. This makes the process much quicker and more efficient. Even though there is no way to eliminate humans from hiring methods, leaving the initial steps to technology is a great way to keep everything moving quickly.

Electronic application programs have the ability to conduct background checks and track the online activities of candidates. By the time HR reps have made the decision to interview, the candidate has already gone through the screening process so valuable time is not wasted.

Employee Benefits

employee-benefits

As most companies will tell you, employee packages are not one size fits all. Now, there are many options available to educate and enroll employees in benefit programs. Using online portals to create a resource library is a great way to help answer employee questions about company programs while keeping them informed with updates and newsletters.

This provides a one-stop experience for education on policies, forms, and important information in which employees can access at any time.

Since the Affordable Care Act, employers have put a lot more focus on encouraging workers to get more involved in company health care programs to help control costs. Using virtual care software is a great way to gain insight from employees to find a benefit package that fits their needs to plan for the future.

As the professional world is becoming increasingly transparent, workers like having access to all their information such as how their paychecks are allocated in accordance to taxes and the benefits. In the past, this meant going through a mountain of paperwork for HR reps.

Now, with payroll technology, employees have easy access to all this information. Automatic record keeping makes sure all the information is organized and up to date for the employee’s convenience.

Engagement

engagement

Cloud and mobile technology plays a huge role in providing information and feedback from workers so companies can make proper changes. Especially as millennials begin to flood the workplace, employee engagement is becoming more and more important.

A company’s ability to actively assess this information is crucial in retaining a young workforce.

Young professionals want to be engaged in their company. Using interactive technology is a great way to give voices to the employees so HR can assess results to show what motivates people and what doesn’t. Based on this information, companies are able to adjust their model to keep everyone producing their best work.

Training

Advancements in information technology have made it simple to train new employees more efficiently. New hires are able to access digital training programsremotely which eliminates the need for professionals to take time away from their work to train the newcomers. There is no denying that human interaction in the training process is necessary as there are a lot company practices that simply cannot be taught by a computer.

However, virtual training programs make it easy for human resources reps to train a larger number of new hires and track progress through computerized testing. Employees will be able to ask more questions when they are in the field which will consume a lot less of the experienced workers’ time.

Performance Management

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Performance management has seen a great deal of enhancement in the digital age. Employee performance can now be easily tracked and analyzed for the benefit of the company. HR can use data and metrics to examine a worker’s performance by pinpointing issues and providing accurate feedback. Employee performance programs can help identify those who do not match up to company standards and find out if they require additional training or need to be let go.

As the digital and professional world evolves, human resources are becoming more and more efficient. With millennials making up over half of the workforce. HR must keep up and build on technological advances to manage both employee expectations and business requirements.

Great post by  via http://tech.co

Original post by  via TNW

Ryan Matzner is the Director of Strategy at Fueled, the leading iPhone application developers and masters of mobile design, based in New York and London. This post was originally published on the Fueled blog.

As Fueled has grown from its infancy to more than 100 employees, I regularly interview many smart candidates who could answer your standard interview questions in their sleep.

While these candidates’ majors, universities, and goals reliably give me basic background information, it’s the deeper insight that makes a candidate stand out. I barely went to college myself. It’s hardly the most important part of a resume.

These tell-me-about-who-you-really-are questions open a window into who the person is, how they think, and what kind of employee they will make.

IMG_4340-1300x866-730x486These are insights I wish I had known back when I first started interviewing people. So for young startups, here’s some food for thought when you start interviewing employees. And for everyone else, maybe this will help you land a job.

What apps can you tell me about that aren’t lame?

We want the apps we make to be trendy, but if your favorite apps are Flappy Bird and Instagram, we have a problem. Tell me about something I haven’t heard of yet.

I like when a candidate knows about apps that I don’t – as long as they’re not lame. And, here’s the twist: Tell me what you would change about this app. “It’s a cool app” is a rather pedestrian opinion.

READ MORE

Join TechStartupJobs Fair Berlin 2014 at Berlin, Germany , Tuesday, May 13, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (CEST)

Original post by Onstartups

Businessman banging his head against the wall.Remember your first business loan? Or, if you’re like many entrepreneurs, you may have initially bootstrapped your startup by buying some stuff on your credit card. You were excited and apprehensive: Excited because now you had the cash to invest in your business, apprehensive because you had just taken on a debt you would have to repay.

But that was okay, because you were confident you could create more value than the interest you would pay. Even though you eventually have to pay off a financial debt, gaining access to the right resources now often marks the difference between success and failure.

That’s true for financial debt – but it’s almost never true for culture debt.

Culture debt happens when a business takes a shortcut and hires an employee with, say, the “right” the skills or experience… but who doesn’t fit the culture. Just one bad hire can create a wave of negativity that washes over every other employee, present and future – and as a result, your entire business.

Unfortunately the interest on culture debt is extremely high: In some cases you will never pay off the debt you incur, even when a culture misfit is let go or leaves.

Here are five all-too-common ways you can create culture debt that can keep your startup from achieving its potential:

1. You see the ivy and miss the poison

The star developer who writes great code… but who also resists taking any direction and refuses to help others… won’t instantly turn over a new interpersonal leaf just because you hire him.

The skilled salesperson who in the short-term always seems to outperform her peers… but who also maneuvers and manipulates and builds kerosene-soaked bridges just waiting to go up in flames… won’t turn into a relationship building, long-term focused ambassador for your company just because you hire her.

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Original post by NIKOS , Workable Blog

Spreadsheets and emails are not hiring tools

Everyone who’s tried to grow a business knows that hiring the right people is probably the hardest part. You’d guess that companies use specialist tools to manage this important and tedious task. But you’d be wrong.

They do it already for every important aspect of their business. They have Trello for project management, Hootsuite for social media, Mailchimp for email marketing and Intercom for customer service.

But when it comes to hiring, a high-stakes investment where they’ll choose their future team, what do they use? A tool built primarily for numerical data analysis. That old chestnut, the trusty excel. Why?

Does this sound familiar?

Chances are you know this scenario. You receive CVs into your inbox, you exchange some emails with colleagues to get their feedback and very quickly the CV is lost in your busy inbox or condemned to an email folder never to be found again. You waste time searching for CVs in email folders and lose track of your colleague’s feedback and your own notes. Maybe the candidate’s details have been entered into a spreadsheet for safe keeping, but maybe that’s been forgotten and no one will check there again anyway.

A complete waste of time, but the worst part is it frustrates and distracts you from the real purpose of hiring: making hard people decisions. It doesn’t end there. Without the right tools, it’s hard to build long-term value from your candidate pool. There are gems to be found in those previous applications, but spreadsheets and inboxes are a sure way to never find them again.

It doesn’t have to be this hard

There’s a better, more efficient and more enjoyable way to manage your hiring. Modern, inexpensive recruitment software helps organise your hiring by keeping all the information in one place. They automatically store candidate details, feedback and communication online in an online, collaborative space where you and your colleagues can find and sort them out.

Need to check the resume of a candidate you spoke to a couple of weeks ago? Sure, there she is in your candidate browser, a few clicks or a search away.

cb

Need to see what your colleague Natalie thought of a candidate when she spoke to her? Sure, there is Natalie’s feedback in the candidate’s profile, alongside her work history and application details – all where it should be, stored together in one easy to find profile.

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Comments Off on How to prepare for a career fair

How to prepare for a career fair

Posted by | 29 August, 2013 | Hiring, Job Fair

Original post by SRRT

Here is some great advice for job-seekers attending career fairs, fromVisual.ly, the website known for its “infographics.”

mastering-the-art-of-a-career-fair_502914f30ab9c_w587

TechMeetups is hosting world’s biggest #TechStartupJobsFair in Sydney,London,New York and Berlin.

Sydney Job fair ticket information

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Before Your Next Interview

Posted by | 21 August, 2013 | Hiring, Job Fair

Original post by ClassesandCareers

Here is some helpful advice for anyone to consider before they go to their next job interview.

what-you-wish-youd-known-before-your-job-interview_50290d661b363_w587

TechMeetups is hosting world’s biggest #TechStartupJobsFair in Sydney,London,New York and Berlin.

Sydney Job fair ticket information

Comments Off on IT JOBS WITH THE HIGHEST PAY

IT JOBS WITH THE HIGHEST PAY

Posted by | 7 August, 2013 | Berlin, Hiring, Jobs, London, New York

Original post by SRRT

Here is a fascinating graphic focusing on IT careers.  It was created by the folks at Staff.com.

Staff-infograph_IT-jobs (1)

TechMeetups is hosting world’s biggest #TechStartupJobsFair in Sydney,London,New York and Berlin.

Sydney Job fair ticket information

Comments Off on How Social Media Can Help (Or Hurt) You In Your Job Search

How Social Media Can Help (Or Hurt) You In Your Job Search

Posted by | 3 June, 2013 | Hiring, Jobs, Social media

Original post by Jacquelyn Smith,Forbes 

dwjtYJOkWZuGTiP7JBJ-STl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVaiQDB_Rd1H6kmuBWtceBJSocial media is a key player in the job search process today.

Sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ allow employers to get a glimpse of who you are outside the confines of a résumé, cover letter, or interview—while they offer job seekers the opportunity to learn about companies they’re interested in; connect with current and former employees; and hear about job openings instantaneously, among other things.

That’s probably why half of all job seekers are active on social networking sites on a daily basis, and more than a third of all employers utilize these sites in their hiring process.

Career transition and talent development consulting firm Lee Hecht Harrisonasked hundreds of job seekers via an online poll, “How active are you on social networking sites?” Forty-eight percent said they’re very active on a daily basis, while 19% said they log on about two or three times per week. Another 22% said they use social networking sites one to three times per month, or less. Only 11% of job seekers said they never use social networking websites.

“I was really excited to see how many job seekers are active on social media,” says Helene Cavalli, vice president of marketing at Lee Hecht Harrison. “As strong advocates, we spend a lot of time coaching job seekers on how to develop a solid social media strategy. While it isn’t the only strategy for finding a job, it’s becoming increasingly important.”

Greg Simpson, a senior vice president at Lee Hecht Harrison, said in a press statement that job seekers must understand how hiring managers and recruiters are using social media in all phases of the selection process.

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Join us in Berlin on June 13th at TechMeetups  #TechStartupJobs Fair Berlin 2013

Comments Off on 7 Tips on Hiring for Your Startup

7 Tips on Hiring for Your Startup

Posted by | 31 May, 2013 | Hiring, Jobs, Startups

 By Sarah Boisvert , Media Shower

Startups are in a unique situation when hiring employees. Usually cash flow is tight or the company is being bootstrapped, so hiring mistakes are more costly than in a company with more financial stability. In addition, early-stage new hires are a large percentage of the total number of employees and have the potential for greater impact, both good and bad.

Here are seven simple tips to help you hire the right staff for your startup.

1.Online Reputation

You’ll still need to secure the legally required permissions to do background checks on potential employees, but be sure to include looking into online reputation.

People tend to more freely discuss topics in their social media communication, thinking it’s between “friends.” Consequently, you’ll get a clearer picture of a candidate’s real attitudes and work ethic, for example, from checking the status of their Internet reputation.

2.   Use Internships

Especially in technical fields, paid internships are a part of the career path. A paid internship of a set timeframe, say a summer, can give you a better picture of how a student with great grades fits into the workplace. Many aspects of the workplace cannot be evaluated until someone is actually in the trenches, so to speak, and has to perform.

3.   University Relationships

Develop strong relationships with thought leaders in your industry, especially those at universities and colleges in your area. Students will be looking for jobs at graduation, and personal contact is a great way to get a good idea about the suitability of a candidate. Especially with students with advanced degrees who have had to complete dissertations, faculty will have had extensive experience working with the students in a setting quite similar to the work environment.

4.   Angel and Entrepreneurs Networks

Strategic and innovative hiring processes will narrow down the candidates for your startup!

Strategic and innovative hiring processes will narrow down the candidates for your startup!

Often a highly motivated individual with entrepreneurial attitude can be found through angel investors or other entrepreneur networks that foster innovation. Their own idea may not have worked out or was proven not to be feasible. But they are excited to be part of a team creating new businesses. This group, of course, carries the risk of leaving when a better idea crosses their path!

5.   Testing

Testing services can highlight good indicators of non-tangible employee skills such as interpersonal communication styles. In addition, at many companies, an interview for a job that requires good writing skills should include a writing test. Simply asking the candidate to read a company product brochure and create a short synopsis can also give you a clear picture of analytical thinking ability.

6.   Start with Contract Work

Many great employees start as independent contractors working on clearly defined projects. This gives both parties a chance to try out the relationship without a full commitment. The work should likely be project-based such as completing a market research study or designing a specific prototype.

7.   Hacker Clubs, Maker Spaces, FabLabs

Creative doers abound at places like FabLabs or maker spaces.

Creative doers abound at places like FabLabs or maker spaces.

Whether for a technology job or not, people who hang out in hacker clubs, maker spaces, and FabLabs tend to be doers. They like to try new things and are usually open to innovation processes, including learning from failures. Visit these hotbeds of creativity to get the word out about your job openings. A maker or hacker’s can-do attitude is a plus for any startup!

Startups that carry innovative methods into their job hiring process are bound to see the kind of success they need to become a “real” company.

Sarah Boisvert is an author who writes on a variety of business and innovation topics. She also covers social media and technology, including 3D printing.

Join us in Berlin on June 13th at TechMeetups  #TechStartupJobs Fair Berlin 2013

Comments Off on Why Humility is Essential for Every New Startup Hire

Why Humility is Essential for Every New Startup Hire

Posted by | 9 February, 2013 | Hiring, Startup

Original post by Tomtunguz

tom_24486146520462_rawWhen interviewing product managers at Google, we ranked candidates on four metrics: technical ability, communication skills, intellect and Googliness. A Googley person embodies the values of the company – a willingness to help others, an upbeat attitude, a passion for the company, and the most important, humility.

In the past week, I asked two heads of engineering to identify the most important characteristic in new hires. Both responded, “humility”. For one startup ascertaining humility is so important, it is the first filter in the interview process.

Disruptive companies reinvent. They don’t copy and execute someone else’s playbook. To be disruptive, a startup’s team must cast aside preconceived notions and assumptions about doing things the “right way” and start inventing new ways.

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TechMeetups presents #TechStartupJobs Fair London 2013

Comments Off on Hiring for a Startup Is Like Dating

Hiring for a Startup Is Like Dating

Posted by | 22 December, 2012 | Hiring

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Original post by DAVID COHEN via WSJ

We all know that startups are about people. That’s got to be your real competitive advantage. Great people will figure out the market and crush it. So how do you attract great people to your team early on when the risks are high and the pay is low? How do you compete with big companies offering large salaries and with thousands of other startups offering a chance to be a part of something? The answer is actually quite simple: Be visible, passionate and genuine.

Most startups are invisible. You might think you’re making noise on Twitter or Facebook, but be honest with yourself. Is anyone really paying attention? The kind of visibility I’m talking about is attending and networking at local tech meet-ups, speaking at conferences as a thought leader, and hanging out where your targets are such as college campuses, industry events and meet-ups. Remember that the best people are generally employed already. If you’re spending all of your time promoting your startup on job boards or events targeting new hires, you’re doing it wrong. You’re invisible. Get out there, and be part of the community.

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TechMeetups presents #TechStartupJobs Fair London 2013

Comments Off on Hiring old people: The dangerous but necessary steroids of the startup world

Hiring old people: The dangerous but necessary steroids of the startup world

Posted by | 10 December, 2012 | Hiring, Startup

Original post by BEN HOROWITZ via pandodaily

Aww man, you sold your soul

Naww man, mad people was frontin’

Aww man, made something from nothing

– Kanye West, “New God Flow”

Your startup is going well, and as your business expands, you hear the dreaded words from someone on your board: “You need to hire some senior people. Some real ‘been there, done that’ executives to help you get the company to the next level.”

Really? Is now the time? If so, where do I begin? And once I get them, what do I do with them? And will I know if they are doing a good job?

The first question you might ask is, “Why do I need senior people at all? Won’t they just ruin the culture with their fancy clothes, political ambitions, and need to go home to see their families?” To some extent, the answer to all of those may be “yes,” which is why this question must be taken quite seriously. However, bringing in the right kind of experience at the right time can mean the difference between bankruptcy and glory.

Let’s go back to the first part of the question. Why hire a senior person? The short answer is time. As a technology startup, from the day you start until your last breath, you will be in a furious race against time. No technology startup has a long shelf life. Even the best ideas become terrible ideas after a certain age. How would Facebook go if Zuckerberg started it last week? At Netscape, we went public when we were 15 months old. Had we started six months later, we would have been late to a market with 37 other browser companies. Even if nobody beats you to the punch, no matter how beautiful your dream, most employees will lose faith after the first five or six years of not achieving it. Hiring someone who has already done what you are trying to do can radically speed up your time to success.

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Comments Off on UK – RESOURCE SOLUTIONS RELEASES SOCIAL RECRUITING GUIDEBOOK

UK – RESOURCE SOLUTIONS RELEASES SOCIAL RECRUITING GUIDEBOOK

Posted by | 10 December, 2012 | Hiring, Jobs, Social media

Original post by StaffingIndustry

Resource Solutions has released their Social Recruiting Playbook, a ‘working guide’ on how to harness the power of social recruitment.

Written in conjunction with industry specialists at Carve Consulting, the playbook is designed to introduce senior executives in HR to social media. With more than 175 million professionals using LinkedIn and Facebook having just reached one billion users, it is clear that social networks are becoming the primary way in which the world communicates, connects and shares news. Organisations know they need to engage but most simply don’t know how to. The playbook explores how organisations can use their social networks to find great people by considering:

– The key social media platforms available for recruitment and the advantages of each

– How job seekers can be engaged through social media

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Be Confident in the People you Hire

Posted by | 28 November, 2012 | Hiring

Original post by s.co

The job market is certainly rough right now and it is important for employers to ensure that they are hiring well-rounded and qualified candidates.

Today’s featured startup, JobEscrow, is recruiting insurance for employers. With JobEscrow, employers list their jobs and recruiters take the task of finding the perfect person to match the position listed, making employers confident in hiring and retaining. Learn more about this Startup California startup from its founder, Ken Winters.

Tell us about your product or service
What’s JobEscrow? In short it is an online marketplace where employers and recruiters conduct business leveraging a pay for performance model based on new hire quality and retention. Companies can buy a job credit for $410 – similar to the price of job postings elsewhere. They choose a recruiter through the JobEscrow network and both parties agree to a fee structure and a payment plan over time. JobEscrow doesn’t take a cut of the recruiting fees like other services and the fees are paid out over time through an escrow account based on new hire quality and retention

Starting in December, we will launch our Outplacement service which provides Employers (who are laying off) a system to put a reward in escrow, on the resume of the employee they are laying off, and if/when a Recruiter helps the Job Seeker obtain their next job, the reward will be paid out to the Recruiter.

What inspired you to start your company?
The catalyst occurred in the Spring of 2009 when a CEO friend called me to clean up a mess a contingent recruiter had made. Huge contingent fee, 90 day guarantee, and then that recruiter backdoor poached the candidate away from the CEO’s small company on the 91st day. The CEO said “I will never use another contingent recruiter every again!”

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We’re excited to announce we’re holding our New York City, US Job Fair on November 29.
Find out more information by visting the NYC Jobfair page.

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